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Description

Jewish experience in La Boca Kosher - Buenos Aires

UNIQUE & EXCLUISIVE Jewish Tour in Buenos Aires through the neighborhoods of La Boca and Barracas.
An unmissable excursion to visit the only factory of alfajores Kosher, historical Synagogues, learn about Jewish immigration and also walk and meet the highlight "Caminito street", the stadium of Boca Juniors and San Telmo ...

This community tour invites visitors to visit Jewish sites of great heritage value for the Argentinean Jewish history, and that can only be visited through Judaic Tourism.

Our hallmark is that all our guides are ACTIVE MEMBERS of the Local Community, and that our tours are organized hand by hand with local institutions.

You can see Facebook reviews from other passengers here
and you can also see the responses of the satisfaction survey of our passenegers here

During the tour we visit:
* The old Synagogue in Rocha street
* The recently recovered Synagogue in Magallanes street, dating from 1906
* Or Torah, Sephardi Synagogue
* The old Synagogue in Piedras street
* Boca Juniors Stadium - Food Stand "Boca Kosher"
* Lanin street
* Caminito street
* Alfajores Kosher Factory "Successo"
* San Telmo

** Visited sites can change according to availability and authorization of institutions.

Duration: 4 hours.
Monday to Friday: entering institutions.

** It takes, at least, 5 working days to book the service, prior to the date of the tour.

To know the tour price, please email: [email protected]

SPECIAL PROMO: 5% off from the total, when booking Jewish tours in more than one city


Optional (long tour - 7 hours):
1- We visit also, the Jewish Quarter "Once" and the center.
2- Jewish Tour + City Tour in Buenos Aires (Full Day), visiting highlights tourist attractions in the city.
** Please ask for Full Day prices by email: [email protected]

Includes: Bilingual guide, transportation, and management to enter to Jewish places.
Pick up and drop off from passengers hotels or cruise port.

Not included donations in Jewish places that will be asked on the visit.

Important: The photos of the promotional flyer are for reference and the places to visit during the tour are subject to availability and personalized organization of the itinerary, according to the interests of each passenger.

Book now: Jewish experience in La Boca - Buenos Aires

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More information about the places we visit in the tour

Alfajores factory Successo

Alfajores factory Successo

"Alfajores" are the most traditional Argentinian cookie. The typical Alfajor is made with two slightly sweet shortbread-like cookies, filled with dulce de leche, a creamy caramel confection made from milk and sugar. SUCCESSO has been m...

Or Torah Israelite Synagogue

Or Torah Israelite Synagogue

Sephardic Orthodox denomination. Around 1920, a new Arab Jewish immigration appears in Buenos Aires, arriving from Syria (Damascus) and Lebanon, which founded its synagogue, the Israelite Sephardic Or Torah Association, on October 17, 19...

Zinkov Synagogue in Rocha street

Zinkov Synagogue in Rocha street

A couple of blocks from the Boca Juniors stadium, there is a synagogue founded in 1931, which was abandoned for years. The synagogue, located on Rocha Street, was founded by Jewish immigrants from Russia and from a town called Zinkov in ...

Kneseth Israel Synagogue in Magallanes street - La Boca

Kneseth Israel Synagogue in Magallanes street - La Boca

Built in 1907, the synagogue Kneseth Israel, located on 1265 Magallanes Street, witnessed the arrival of the first Jewish immigrants from Europe, who settled in the neighborhoods of La Boca and Barracas. Since its creation, an Ashkenazi ...

Bet El Synagogue in Piedras street

Bet El Synagogue in Piedras street

The Synagogue of Piedras street, named Bet-El, was the second synagogue built in Buenos Aires. Dated from 1875 and founded by Sephardic Moroccan Jew inmigrants. The Latin Israelite Congregation, founder of this synagogue, was able to purch...

History of Jewish immigration

Jews who fled the Inquisition settled in Argentina but assimilated into society "non- Jewish".
During colonial times the permanence of persons of Jewish faith was banned. Nevertheless, many of the Portuguese traders were Sephardic Jews.
After 1810 Jews especially from France and other parts of Western Europe began to settle in Argentina.
In 1853, began the existence of Argentine Jewish community.
In 1862 the current Israeli Congregation of Argentina was created.
In 1876 the Argentine government authorized the exercise of other religions.
By the late nineteenth, and early twentieth century, many Ashkenazi Jews arrived in the country from Eastern Europe, fleeing persecution and pogroms. Several of them founded the colony Moisesville in the province of Santa Fe, one of the most important jewish colonization in Argentine.

Between 1885-1889 a total of 2,385 Jews arrived in the country aboard the ship Weser, because of the increasing threats of expulsion of the Jews from the Russian areas.
In 1888 was published in Buenos Aires the first newspaper written in Hebrew characters, with the name of the Phonograph Hebraic .
Then in 1889 came from Germany about 1,200 immigrants, once again aboard the Weser and Bremer from Ukraine.

In 1890 , Argentina launched his immigration plan, which resulted that from 1891-1896 into the country some 20,121 Jews from Russia and Romania, settling, mostly in Buenos Aires, Entre Rios and Santa Fe.

In 1891 , steam Pampa rented by Baron Hirsch took 817 Jewish immigrants from Ukraine, Poland, Lithuania and Bessarabia. This migration gave rise to colonies of Carlos Casares and Entre Rios.
In the early twentieth century , the Province of Entre Rios grew to about 170 Jewish settlements .

The September 27, 1897 the cornerstone of the current Jewish Synagogue Congregation Argentina was placed in 785 Liberty Street , in Buenos Aires.
Between 1906 and 1912 , Jewish immigration increased very fast, with most of Eastern Europe, also of Morocco and the Ottoman Empire. Jewish immigrants in Argentina quickly adapted and came to play an important role in society Argentina .
In 1920, about 150,000 Jews lived in Argentina .
Since 1928, waves of Jewish immigrants came from Germany and the rest of occupied Europe, receiving around 45,000 European Jews.
In the early fifties Jewish immigration began to decline, while the country established relations with the State of Israel.
During the nineties, the Jewish community has undergone two major terrorist attacks, which remain unresolved.

Currently, about 244,000 Jews live in Argentina , 80% of the Jewish community living in the federal capital and the rest in the great Buenos Aires and major cities of the country as well as in agricultural colonies in the provinces of Entre Rios and Santa Fe founded to house immigrants, of which the most important are now Basavilbaso Moisesville, Villa Dominguez and Villa Clara.

In Buenos Aires, there are neighborhoods characterized by their number of Jewish population, like Balvanera "once" , Villa Crespo , Belgrano, among others. In several of these , there are also several Jewish synagogues and Jewish institutions.

A little about the country

Argentina is a sovereign state, organized as a representative and Federal Republic.

Its territory is divided into 23 provinces and an autonomous city, Buenos Aires, the nation capital and seat of the federal goverment.

It has an area of 2780400 km and a population of 40 million.

The official language is Spanish and the climate is temperate.